Minnesota Governor Tim Walz commented today that if Minnesotan's continue to vaccinate, and the pandemic continues on its current trajectory, the 2021 Minnesota State Fair could be 'pretty close to normal' following its cancellation in 2020 due to COVID-19.

Walz kept his cards close to his vest regarding a planned announcement next week about re-openings and more restriction roll-backs, saying discussions with health officials and business groups are ongoing.

Get our free mobile app

Last year the 'Great Minnesota Get Together' was canceled for only the sixth time in the fair's history. The first five times occurred in 1861 and 1862, 1893, 1945, and again in 1946.

STORY: Five Other Times the Minnesota State Fair was Canceled

Minnesota State Fair board president Jerry Hammer says:

From the day we canceled in 2020, our priority has been to ensure the future of the fair by holding our operation together. II cannot stress enough how critical our expert staff is to the success of the fair. They’re experienced pros, and there is no fair without them. Our staff is ready to go, and we can’t wait to welcome everyone back together at the State Fair.

In addition to the cancellation of the 2020 Minnesota State Fair, all county fairs in the state here also shelved last summer.

After the 2020 State Fair was cancelled, a number of alternative options were rolled out, including a two-part State Fair drive-through Food Parade, virtual vendor market, virtual competition showcases, and unique 2020 fair merchandise availability.

The Minnesota State Fair is one of the largest and best-attended expositions in the world, attracting more than 2 million visitors annually. Showcasing Minnesota’s finest agriculture, art and industry, the Great Minnesota Get-Together is always 12 Days of Fun Ending Labor Day. Visit mnstatefair.org for more information. The 2021 Minnesota State Fair runs Aug. 26 - Labor Day, Sept. 6.

The 25 Best Places to Live in Minnesota

Stacker compiled a list of the best places to live in Minnesota using data from Niche. Niche ranks places to live based on a variety of factors including cost of living, schools, health care, recreation, and weather. Cities, suburbs, and towns were included. Listings and images are from realtor.com.

On the list, there's a robust mix of offerings from great schools and nightlife to high walkability and public parks. Some areas have enjoyed rapid growth thanks to new businesses moving to the area, while others offer glimpses into area history with well-preserved architecture and museums. Keep reading to see if your hometown made the list.