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Rochester, MN (KROC-AM News) - The winter storm that arrived in the region late last night blanketed the Rochester area with 6-8 inches of new snow.

The National Weather Service received a report of 8 inches of accumulation in southeast Rochester and several reports of 6.5 inches of accumulation in northwest Rochester. The unofficial snowfall total at the Rochester Airport was 6.2 inches. The record for January 19 is 24.4 inches in 1999.

 

National Weather Service
National Weather Service
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The highest snowfall totals from the storm have been reported in northern Iowa where there are numerous reports of 8-10 inches of new snow.

Minnesota State Patrol photo
Minnesota State Patrol photo
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The slippery conditions created by the falling snow and reduced visibility contributed to numerous crashes and vehicle spin-outs statewide. The State Patrol says it responded to more than 110 crashes from 9:30 last night through 11:30 this morning. There were nearly 200 reports of spin-outs and vehicles off the road. So far, there have been no reports of any serious injuries or fatalities.

MnDOT photo
MnDOT photo
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Travel conditions in southeastern Minnesota rapidly improved this afternoon but remain dicey and areas west of I-35 where many of the major highways are still completely snow and ice covered. As of 5 PM, the majority of the major roadways monitored by the Minnesota Department of Transportation in the southeastern corner of the state are now back to normal winter driving conditions, although sections of I-90 to the east and west of Rochester, and Highway 14 to the west of Rochester were still described as partially snow-covered.

HAVE YOU SEEN ME? 32 Kids Missing From Minnesota

As of January 19, 2023, there are 32 children missing from across Minnesota that have still not been found, according to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. If you have seen any of them, or have any information on their whereabouts, please don’t hesitate to call 911 or you can call the National Center at 1-800-843-5678 (1-800-THE-LOST).

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